Our Services

Planning and Designing

Example blog post alt

Fibre Optic Fusion Splicing

Example blog post alt

Fusion Splicing is where two optical fibres are joined using a heat process. The process is a very complicated procedure that requires skilled fibre optic engineers as the two fibres need to be joined in such a way that light can still pass through perfectly. If the fibres are not joined correctly it could cause the light to be scattered or reflected. A perfect splice should be almost identical to the original fibre optic cable. A tool called an electric arc is used for the heat required but the splice can also be completed using a gas flame or laser. Precise heat is required when fusion splicing after the fibre ends have been prepared for the fusion process. All protective coverings must first be removed from the fibre ends. The fibre is then cleaved to produce a completely flat fibre and checked under a microscope for any defects.

OTDR testing

Example blog post alt

OTDR Testing is carried out with Tri Band test equipment and based on your own requirements can be either Uni or Bi-directional. The Tri Band testing covers the O, C and L Bands. The Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) is a powerful fibre optic test instrument in that it acts like an optical radar in locating sources of error with the fibre system. It yields a plot, or trace, indicating the loss versus distance. This information allows events in the optical fibre system such as fibre splices and connections to be located and their loss measured. The OTDR is a complex instrument and so detailed interpretation of an OTDR trace is a job for an experienced or expert fibre tester. The OTDR is not the reference test method for fibre attenuation, this being an ILM technique, and indeed the OTDR has some short-comings as an accurate loss measurement instrument. Where the OTDR does dominate is in the spatial information it provides on any fibres with high attenuation or any poor quality splicing. The other advantage of this technique is that the stored trace shows exactly how the measurement was conducted, something the ILM technique does not provide, and this allows an expert OTDR trace analyser to know something of the quality of the measurement results provided.

Blown fibre

Example blog post alt

What is Blown Fibre? Blown fibre optic is a cabling solution using glass fibre optic cables, blown through a ducting pipe. The main ducting pipe can have up to 19 micro ducts contained within it. A Coated “blow able” optical fibre is blown through a micro duct using compressed air. Carried by viscous drag, the fibres are lifted into the airstream and away from the wall of the micro duct, eliminating friction even around the tightest bends. One Fibre optic strand can carry 10 gigabytes of data every second or over 3000 telephone conversations. The benefits of blown fibre are simplified planning, cost effective solution, speed of installation, and is greener solution compared to copper cable.